How to generate trust in organization: 8/8 – Start to trust

This is the last posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 8 – Start to trust

Obviously the last – but not the least – thing to create trust is to trust. If you don’t trust to people, it is very unlikely that they would trust you or the organization you are presenting.

For some people it is really hard to trust people. And no doubt, too often people will break the trust. But becoming cynical just makes leader’s life hard, or at least the leader becomes a bottleneck for growth. When we are trying to lift our team/organization to the level of high performance, it is just crucial to understand:

There is no way you can win big championships alone.

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How to generate trust in organization: 7/8 – Choose your battles

This is the 7th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 7 – Choose your battles

Positive feedback improves employees’ self esteem and eventually will raise their motivation. And a motivated employee is much more creative, effective and proactive than an unmotivated one. That is why it is often much better to say something nice than to point out what could have been done better. Great leaders are aware that everything can be done better – but it is better to choose the battles that make a real difference.

With time it is possible to raise the standards and coach anyone to be at least a good expert. Being great requires passion, talent and hard work – these elements are not available to all, so make sure you don’t waste too much time with a person who does not aim for excellence.

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How to generate trust in organization: 6/8 – Be consistent and fair

This is the 6th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 6 – Be consistent and fair

Sure signs of a lousy leader are being irrational or favoring people. If people are scared of the leader’s mood swings or know that no matter they do, they cannot get their approval – moral is very likely to be bad. Even the favored people are usually aware of the shittyness of a bad leader, but tolerate it as they are getting an advantage from it.

Irrational people make lousy leaders.
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It should be noted that being fair doesn’t mean that an organization should be “a communistic system” where everybody gets the same despite of their role or efforts. High performance should be rewarded, but everyone should have the same possibilities to be rewarded.

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How to generate trust in organization: 5/8 – Never run away from responsibility

This is the 5th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 5 – Never run away from responsibility

Leaders are expected to lead and carry the weight of sometimes hard decisions. Quite often they are paid better than the average white collar worker because of responsibilities. If leaders end up trying to run away from their duties, they are not worth their salary.

But be careful: great leaders do not micromanage. Check out this Protip 1 I wrote earlier about the topic.“The risk of a wrong decision is preferable to the terror of indecision.”

 

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How to generate trust in organization: 4/8 – Keep your promises

This is the 4th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

"Keep every promise you make and only make promises you can keep."

How to generate trust in organization: 4 – Keep your promises

It is too easy to postpone decisions by saying “let’s do or get that later, next month, next spring, next financial year…” but guess what –  if you never plan to keep that promise:

  1. It is much better to say that it is not possible.
  2. Remember to say why it is not possible (and people usually understand).
  3. Never lie or make promises that you cannot keep.

Those leaders who end up not keeping their promises quickly end up tagged as weak bullshit talkers. And surprise surprise: weak leaders are not considered as good leaders.

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How to generate trust in organization: 3/8 – Show that you care

This is the 3rd posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 3 – Show that you care

Listen, discuss, ask questions that are not about you – but the person you are talking with. Remember this: Great leaders understand that it is never about me, it’s always about you.

When discussing, focus your attention 100% to the person you are having the conversation with. Do not browse the Internet, excel, social media or newspaper. If there is no time and possibility to focus, and the employee wants to have a conversation, politely and patiently express that you are busy and arrange a private meeting with them.

We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.

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How to generate trust in organization: 2/8 – Be honest

This is the 2nd posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 2 – Be honest

Never lie, steal or tell things that are not true. People scan your behavior constantly and even small wrong deeds are up-scaled. Meaning that even the one cinnamon roll you took without permission in front of your employee gives the signal that you are a dishonest person by nature. This gives an example for the employee that honesty is not an appreciated value. Don’t do that. Period.

"Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters." Albert Einstein

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The patient reader bonus:)

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How to generate trust in organization: 1/8 – Defend your tribe

FOREWORD

This is the 1st posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

Why generate trust?

In my opinion, a leadership that is based on trust and service to others is the only possible way to build up a lasting high performance organization. And if you need (?) some rational proofs why so, please note that there are plenty of studies* which prove that the happiness within comes from helping others to excel.

“People buy into the leader before they buy into the vision.”
John C. Maxwell

The following series is my interpretation of the best practices available to generate trust, which I consider as the foundation of any great place to work.

How to generate trust in organization: 1 – Defend your tribe

The most efficient practice by far in creating trust is the feeling of playing in the same team. The best leaders are trusted to be the guardians of employees during a time of struggle. It can take only one defending act to make an employee a lifelong follower and friend. The amount of gratitude generated by defending your tribe is almost beyond comprehension with high moral people. But if the leader is not shielding his or her troops from injustice the result is quite the opposite.

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