How To Build A Roadmap for Success

Roadmaps are great. They can help us to implement long and difficult strategies to the ground level operations, make our team’s goals more achievable, and also are a fun way to get to know yourself. I personally recommend doing a roadmap for any goal that feels even a bit challenging to reach. It can be done for yourself, for your team, or why not even for the family?

How a roadmap should look like?

Don’t worry that much about the form or look of the roadmap. Most of all it is a way to communicate what to do and when. For sure it can be a piece of visually stunning art, but a list written in a napkin can also do the job. In short, the best roadmap is the one you are able to carry either in your mind or in your pocket.

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How to fill the roadmap?

  1. First make sure that you know where we are now. Which are your strengths, aspirations and ambitions?
  2. Get a clear vision of your goal. Where do you want to go? Why do you want to go there? What happens when you get there? How does it feel when you reach your destination? Images can help you visualize your goal. Let’s say you want to get a raise in order to buy a new car. So google the image and use it to get a good grip of what you are working for.
  3. What skills, elements, investments you need to make to get started. These are most likely the first steps on your trip.
  4. Now you have done the beginning and the end. Draw a path between them and start building the steps one by one.
  5. For some people it can be a tremendous help if you think about it as playing a board game and building the path from a to b, c to d and so on.
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  6. Prefer using as concrete tasks as possible.
  7. Avoid placing goals that are not achievable. It is important to have big plans, but it is as important to know your limits in order to not get too badly hurt. Being successful is a delicate mix of being ambitious as well as rational and realistic.
  8. Remember to update your roadmap as you are working your way on it. Sometimes in life things happen overnight, and sometimes there can be obstacles that require you to take a detour.
  9. Also remember to reward yourself when reaching mid-goals and goals. That will help you to reach your goals better in the future. Find out how the positive reinforcement works – even for yourself. 😉
  10. Make sure you make your goals and roadmaps public, it will increase the possibility of completing them. At least if you want your organization to know where they should be heading to. But you can also consider communicating your own growth plan, as by doing so you might find friends who share the same goal, and you can help each other. Good leaders also want to help their employees to grow, so it can be that by sharing your roadmap, you are able to help your boss to do their job better.

Here is the example I made for the 2017

It is good to know, that as this is an upper level roadmap, each box will require its own roadmap. But alas; this will help me to remember the big picture I am building for the 2017, and I wish that it would help you to build your own roadmap to be an ever better leader!

 

 

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How to generate trust in organization: 8/8 – Start to trust

This is the last posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 8 – Start to trust

Obviously the last – but not the least – thing to create trust is to trust. If you don’t trust to people, it is very unlikely that they would trust you or the organization you are presenting.

For some people it is really hard to trust people. And no doubt, too often people will break the trust. But becoming cynical just makes leader’s life hard, or at least the leader becomes a bottleneck for growth. When we are trying to lift our team/organization to the level of high performance, it is just crucial to understand:

There is no way you can win big championships alone.

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How to generate trust in organization: 7/8 – Choose your battles

This is the 7th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 7 – Choose your battles

Positive feedback improves employees’ self esteem and eventually will raise their motivation. And a motivated employee is much more creative, effective and proactive than an unmotivated one. That is why it is often much better to say something nice than to point out what could have been done better. Great leaders are aware that everything can be done better – but it is better to choose the battles that make a real difference.

With time it is possible to raise the standards and coach anyone to be at least a good expert. Being great requires passion, talent and hard work – these elements are not available to all, so make sure you don’t waste too much time with a person who does not aim for excellence.

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How to generate trust in organization: 6/8 – Be consistent and fair

This is the 6th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 6 – Be consistent and fair

Sure signs of a lousy leader are being irrational or favoring people. If people are scared of the leader’s mood swings or know that no matter they do, they cannot get their approval – moral is very likely to be bad. Even the favored people are usually aware of the shittyness of a bad leader, but tolerate it as they are getting an advantage from it.

Irrational people make lousy leaders.
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It should be noted that being fair doesn’t mean that an organization should be “a communistic system” where everybody gets the same despite of their role or efforts. High performance should be rewarded, but everyone should have the same possibilities to be rewarded.

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How to generate trust in organization: 5/8 – Never run away from responsibility

This is the 5th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 5 – Never run away from responsibility

Leaders are expected to lead and carry the weight of sometimes hard decisions. Quite often they are paid better than the average white collar worker because of responsibilities. If leaders end up trying to run away from their duties, they are not worth their salary.

But be careful: great leaders do not micromanage. Check out this Protip 1 I wrote earlier about the topic.“The risk of a wrong decision is preferable to the terror of indecision.”

 

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How to generate trust in organization: 4/8 – Keep your promises

This is the 4th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

"Keep every promise you make and only make promises you can keep."

How to generate trust in organization: 4 – Keep your promises

It is too easy to postpone decisions by saying “let’s do or get that later, next month, next spring, next financial year…” but guess what –  if you never plan to keep that promise:

  1. It is much better to say that it is not possible.
  2. Remember to say why it is not possible (and people usually understand).
  3. Never lie or make promises that you cannot keep.

Those leaders who end up not keeping their promises quickly end up tagged as weak bullshit talkers. And surprise surprise: weak leaders are not considered as good leaders.

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How to generate trust in organization: 3/8 – Show that you care

This is the 3rd posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 3 – Show that you care

Listen, discuss, ask questions that are not about you – but the person you are talking with. Remember this: Great leaders understand that it is never about me, it’s always about you.

When discussing, focus your attention 100% to the person you are having the conversation with. Do not browse the Internet, excel, social media or newspaper. If there is no time and possibility to focus, and the employee wants to have a conversation, politely and patiently express that you are busy and arrange a private meeting with them.

We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.

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How to generate trust in organization: 2/8 – Be honest

This is the 2nd posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 2 – Be honest

Never lie, steal or tell things that are not true. People scan your behavior constantly and even small wrong deeds are up-scaled. Meaning that even the one cinnamon roll you took without permission in front of your employee gives the signal that you are a dishonest person by nature. This gives an example for the employee that honesty is not an appreciated value. Don’t do that. Period.

"Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters." Albert Einstein

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The patient reader bonus:)

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How to generate trust in organization: 1/8 – Defend your tribe

FOREWORD

This is the 1st posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

Why generate trust?

In my opinion, a leadership that is based on trust and service to others is the only possible way to build up a lasting high performance organization. And if you need (?) some rational proofs why so, please note that there are plenty of studies* which prove that the happiness within comes from helping others to excel.

“People buy into the leader before they buy into the vision.”
John C. Maxwell

The following series is my interpretation of the best practices available to generate trust, which I consider as the foundation of any great place to work.

How to generate trust in organization: 1 – Defend your tribe

The most efficient practice by far in creating trust is the feeling of playing in the same team. The best leaders are trusted to be the guardians of employees during a time of struggle. It can take only one defending act to make an employee a lifelong follower and friend. The amount of gratitude generated by defending your tribe is almost beyond comprehension with high moral people. But if the leader is not shielding his or her troops from injustice the result is quite the opposite.

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