How to generate trust in organization: 7/8 – Choose your battles

This is the 7th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 7 – Choose your battles

Positive feedback improves employees’ self esteem and eventually will raise their motivation. And a motivated employee is much more creative, effective and proactive than an unmotivated one. That is why it is often much better to say something nice than to point out what could have been done better. Great leaders are aware that everything can be done better – but it is better to choose the battles that make a real difference.

With time it is possible to raise the standards and coach anyone to be at least a good expert. Being great requires passion, talent and hard work – these elements are not available to all, so make sure you don’t waste too much time with a person who does not aim for excellence.

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How to generate trust in organization: 5/8 – Never run away from responsibility

This is the 5th posting from a series of 8 short articles “How to generate trust in an organization”. The topics spring to life from my own experiences as well as from various books and articles I’ve read in the past. The most influential writers have no doubt been John C. Maxwell and Simon Sinek. Both emphasize the importance of high moral driven “people first” leadership.

How to generate trust in organization: 5 – Never run away from responsibility

Leaders are expected to lead and carry the weight of sometimes hard decisions. Quite often they are paid better than the average white collar worker because of responsibilities. If leaders end up trying to run away from their duties, they are not worth their salary.

But be careful: great leaders do not micromanage. Check out this Protip 1 I wrote earlier about the topic.“The risk of a wrong decision is preferable to the terror of indecision.”

 

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Protip 1: Focus on relevant issues

Too often leaders rush to solve mundane problems as it gives a warm and fuzzy feeling of purpose: “I’ve done my job and earned my salary. Now I can bath in my cozy mundanity for a while more…”

But guess what? Although leaders are paid to lead and make decisions, it is not wise to make every decision by themselves. See, as by doing so the leader ends up passivating employees when solving every possible problem. And by that he or she also makes himself/herself a bottleneck for growth. The point is to solve REAL challenges – those issues that an employee is not able to solve independently.

Choose your battles!

To summarize: Give up that warm and fuzzy feeling and use your muscles to where extra effort is needed.

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